CSX Update

Lately, you’ve not found a lot of CSX coverage here on Lakeland Local. Frankly, I’ve had nothing to add over what the Tribune and Ledger have reported. Also, I believe the project is getting plenty of non-media scrutiny from the Downtown Lakeland Partnership and the Stop CSX in Polk County website. Plus, three Ledger blogs are covering aspects of the CSX story: Tom Palmer, Diane Lacey Allen, and Bill Rufty.

Still, I’ll be watching Monday’s 9 am Lakeland City Commission meeting. According to the agenda, the commission will vote on Resolution 08-007 “Resolution Indicating Support for Alternatives to the Proposed CSX Integrated Logistics Center (ILC) Facility.” You can watch also on the Web or on cable at channel 622.

I fear we’ll hear more about Quiet Zones than rerouting freight trains. You might want to read a Federal report form 2000 (pdf) One telling statistic: “55 percent of the collisions occurred when motorists deliberately drove around lowered gates. These collisions occurred 128 percent more often at crossings with whistle bans than at other crossings.” That’s why to create Quiet Zones you must first install gates that can’t be driven around.

Well, unless you live in Orlando:

Tuesday, Eyewitness News timed the CSX train sitting on the tracks along South Street. It didn’t move for 30 minutes. Traffic was so backed up that drivers started getting out of their cars. Some even lifted up the crossing arms so they could make an illegal u-turn and go around the train.

Eyewitness News confronted a CSX employee, asking what the legal limit is that they can block the road.

“All day,” was the response. — WFTV

Again, this isn’t a noise problem; it’s a traffic problem. We have at least six crossings to consider. Spending money to close New York and create quiet zones is throwing money down a rabbit hole. The zones really aren’t quiet. You can’t silence the rumble of a mile long train. Quiet Zones are not permanent installations. They have to be re-approved every three years. Yes, after they’re constructed you’ll have to maintain them at additional cost. I wonder who will pay for that?

6 thoughts on “CSX Update

  1. I think there is a law that limits the time that a train can hold up a crossing, at one time i think it 3 min.s but with all of the back door dealing that go’s on with the Gov. who no’s and one thing more when did the railroad ever get the idea that they were still the owner of abandoned rail track’s, some one needs to look up the Fed.Rail Act. i believe that when they abandon track’s that reverts back to the entities that gave them the land to run their tracks on. Thank You Bob

  2. I think there is a law that limits the time that a train can hold up a crossing, at one time i think it 3 min.s but with all of the back door dealing that go’s on with the Gov. who no’s and one thing more when did the railroad ever get the idea that they were still the owner of abandoned rail track’s, some one needs to look up the Fed.Rail Act. i believe that when they abandon track’s that reverts back to the entities that gave them the land to run their tracks on. Thank You Bob

  3. Even if there are laws about a train sitting on the track too long, who do you report it to and who enforces it? No one can pinpoint who is in charge. That’s one of the issues with the railroad, they seem to have more power than the government.

  4. Even if there are laws about a train sitting on the track too long, who do you report it to and who enforces it? No one can pinpoint who is in charge. That’s one of the issues with the railroad, they seem to have more power than the government.

  5. There are ordinances on the books in Lakeland that specifically lay out how long a train can block an intersection. 30 minutes would be a violation. The Police Department could issue CSX a citation. CSX has been known to ignore these type of citations, claiming that only the Feds can touch them. And there’s talk of closing Massachusetts and Florida to vehicle traffic as the amount of trains expected in the future preclude safe and swift movement of automotive traffic through the intersections.

  6. There are ordinances on the books in Lakeland that specifically lay out how long a train can block an intersection. 30 minutes would be a violation. The Police Department could issue CSX a citation. CSX has been known to ignore these type of citations, claiming that only the Feds can touch them. And there’s talk of closing Massachusetts and Florida to vehicle traffic as the amount of trains expected in the future preclude safe and swift movement of automotive traffic through the intersections.

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